Fancy you stopped in

J Kahele

 

 

REVIEW OF CHINESE WALLS

 

A married man with children, Nicholas Powell accepts a position with United National in Hong Kong. It is there he meets a young Chinese man, Daniel, a bank manager. They make plans to meet later that night and their friendship soon blossoms into a relationship. Daniel desperately wants their relationship to be out in the open, but Nicholas is hesitant, not wanting to reveal his hidden secret as a gay man.

The story shows true corruption in the banking industry and how one minute you’re at the top and the next you’re scraping at the bottom. As the story unfolds, Nicholas’s life begins to unravel as Daniel leaves him after finding out about an affair and he is asked to resign from his employer. It’s this tragedy that finally opens Nicholas’s eyes to truly what is the most important to him, Daniel.

So what did I like the best about this novel?

Chinese Walls exposes true prejudice in the corporate banking world against same sex couples and shows corruption that happens all too often in the banking world and how one can get caught up into power and money. My favorite part of the novel, was when everything came down around Nicholas and he realized the true importance of anyone’s life is love, without it, you have nothing.

 

My rating 5.0 out of 5.0

 

Get the book here.

 

 About the Author:

 

 David Clive Price has had a passion for Asia's peoples and cultures ever since he went to Japan in the 1980s and wrote a book about his travels throughout the country. This passion developed further in Hong Kong, where he struggled to make ends meet as a writer in the 1990s, wrote economic reports about Asian countries, and travelled all over the region researching features for international magazines. Finding himself on his pin ends with his Chinese spouse in a walk-up one-room apartment above a nightclub in Hong Kong, he resolved to join the corporate world and became Chief Speechwriter for Asia for one of the world's leading banks. It was 1995. Hong Kong was preparing to return to China. David spent the next few years writing speeches to be given all over Asia and the world. He also began publishing a series of books on South Korea, Hong Kong, China, India, and Buddhism in the daily life of Asia.


Freeing himself from corporate life, he set up his own consultancy advising Asian multinationals and Western companies with Asian operations on their strategic and intercultural communications. This experience, and the challenges he faced launching his own business, form the basis of his new book The Master Key to Asia: A 6-Step Guide to Unlocking New Markets and his innovative Master Key Series on the business cultures, etiquettes and customs of Asia's high-growth markets. 
He has written books on the ‘lost civilization’ of rural Italy, music and Catholic conspiracies in Elizabeth I’s England, Buddhism in the daily life of Asia, the secret world of China’s Forbidden City, the intricacies of corporate life in London and Hong Kong, off-the-beaten track Seoul and South Korea, and the underworld of 1980s New York.
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